#FReadom - How to write, speak, support


Write a letter to the editor

Use these instructions to send a letter to the editor to a local paper. The letter can relate to current events in your area, or just be a letter in support of libraries and how librarians support students. Let local papers hear from library supporters!

Click here for TIPS on writing your letter.

After you write your letter or after it is published, please document it here in our form so we can gather statistics! (anonymous if needed).

Write a letter to your school board

Write a school board a positive letter in support of libraries and student access. There are THREE optional letters below that you can cut and paste or make a copy of if you have a GMail account and/or adapt to make the message your own. You can email a singular board member, a group of board members, and/ or include the superintendent.

Write a letter/ email to:

  1. your own area school board members

  2. a school board in a district near you

  3. a school board in a district that is facing book challenges

How to find email addresses:

On the district webpage, locate the school board or trustees page. You can do a keyword search on the district’s website if you can’t locate it in the menu, or even Google “_______ ISD School Board” and it should list their contact information. Some districts have a group email for board trustees, and some you have to email each member.


Click Here if you have a Gmail account to make a copy of the letter/ email.

Click the Use Template button.

Click Here if you have a Gmail account to make a copy of the letter/ email.

Click the Use Template button.

Click Here if you have a Gmail account to make a copy of the letter/ email.

Click the Use Template button.

What to say about the work of librarians - advice

How to speak at a school board meeting

  1. Locate the School Board meeting page on your district's website and determine the procedure for signing up to speak. Some districts require sign up ahead of time, and some don't.

  2. Prepare your remarks. Usually the remarks to the board are timed, and that information should be on the board's webpage. (usually it's between 1 - 5 minutes).

  3. Practice your remarks and time yourself. Board meetings can be emotional and by practicing, you will feel more prepared. Meetings allow speakers to use notes.

  4. Topics/Talking Points to consider

    1. Intellectual freedom and democracy

    2. Students as critical thinkers

    3. Librarians as trained professionals

    4. Ask district to follow published policies

    5. Personal anecdote about the power of a diverse book/reading/libraries

    6. For more details, contact us or use materials from ALA, PEN America or NCAC (see our Resources page).


School board races are won locally - start a local group to help educate voters and get out the vote

Librarian Resources